Quick Kids Reviews #17

Title: Rosa Parks (Little People, Big Dreams)
Author:
Isabel Sanchez Vegara
Illustrator:
Miguel Bustos
Source:
Free ARC from Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Note: As stated under the Source (above), I received this book for free from Frances Lincoln Children’s Books via NetGalley. I pride myself on writing fair and honest reviews.

In this edition of Little People, Big Dreams, we meet the legendary Bruce Lee. While most adults likely know his name and associate him with martial arts movies, there is more to Bruce Lee than many probably realize. For instance, though his parents were from Hong Kong, he was actually born in an American hospital! In his youth, he got involved with some bad people, but he turned himself around, focusing on being a better person. And he shared what he learned with others. While Bruce Lee died unexpectedly at a young age, he helped open the door to Hollywood a smidge wider for other Asian Americans.

This book is a nice introduction to Bruce Lee’s life and contributions. As is always the case with this series, I learned new things. The illustrations were not my favorite but did not detract from my enjoyment of the book.

As ever, I recommend any book from this series.

Title: Rudolf Nureyev (Little People, Big Dreams)
Author: Isabel Sanchez Vegara
Illustrator: Eleonora Arosio
Source: Free ARC from Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Note: As stated under the Source (above), I received this book for free from Frances Lincoln Children’s Books via NetGalley. I pride myself on writing fair and honest reviews.

I honestly don’t know how I could love this series any more than I already do, yet with every installment, I find myself blown away. Little People, Big Dreams, is a brilliant, much needed series for young children, with each edition presenting an important (but not always well-known) person who has made a difference in the world. This time, we are introduced to Rudolf Nureyev, a ballet dancer from Russia, whose passion and dedication transformed ballet for male dancers around the world. I was unfamiliar with Rudolf Nureyev prior to reading this book, but in a few short pages, I have learned a great deal about who he was and what an important contribution he made.

This little book teaches lessons about passion, perseverance, and reminds us all that all things are for all people. Wonderful lessons every child will benefit from.

A must read!

Title: A Friend for Henry
Author:
Jenn Bailey
Illustrator:
Mika Song
Source:
Free ARC from Chronicle books

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Note: As stated under the Source (above), I received this book for free from Chronicle Books via Edelweiss. I pride myself on writing fair and honest reviews.

A Friend for Henry is a book about a little boy who, though never stated, I suspect has autism (as do two of my kiddos). One of the facets of his autism is being very particular about certain things and rather anxious about change and trying new things. Henry very much wants to find a friend in his classroom, but he is struggling to find someone who will fit well into his world. In the end, with some perseverance and the littlest bit of flexibility, Henry finds just the person.

As the mother of two autistic children, I appreciate any effort to explain their differences and challenges to young children. With the right support and information, many children with unique differences can blend into their school community, but it helps if that education starts at home. Tolerance is a start, but inclusion and acceptance should always be the goal. This book seems like a decent start down that road.

Title: Anna at the Art Museum
Author:
Hazel Hutchins, Gail Herbert
Illustrator:
Lil Crump
Source:
Free ARC from Annick Press

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐

Note: As stated under the Source (above), I received this book for free from Annick Press via NetGalley. I pride myself on writing fair and honest reviews.

Anna at the Art Museum is a book I desperately wanted to love. Art is such a critical part of the human experience and also something I feel children aren’t exposed to enough. Any exposure is good in my book! The illustrations in this book were wonderful, and the museum setting allowed some beautiful paintings to be presented. However, I didn’t feel the aha moment along with Anna. I understood the connection she finally had to a piece, and I appreciate the sentiment that love for art starts with that first connection, but it just felt a bit empty to me. Yes, it’s a children’s book, but there was an overall disconnect for me. That said, I love the intent and the About the Art section at the back of the book. However, it was ultimately just ok for me.

2 Replies to “Quick Kids Reviews #17”

  1. Great reviews Myndi. You know how much I love the Little People, Big Dreams series, but somehow I missed these two. I would love to read the Rudolph Nuryev book. A Friend for Henry interests me very much. I am not sure if I told you that my grandson has been identified as being on the autism spectrum and social interactions are getting more difficult for him.

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